Finding time to make this mess look good

I’ve lost interest in Connectivism, which is making it hard to continue with the course. The more I think about it the more it feels like an attempt to lay a brand claim on an existing phenomenon, not to actually present anything new, nor to even explain itself.

Anyway, there’s clearly no respect for questioning or for those who would even mildly challenge this apparently private piece of intellectual property. So why bother with it?

Carmen Tschofen referenced this article at the very beginning of the discussion thread at Attacks on Connectivism.

Network Promises and Their Implications

http://rusc.uoc.edu/ojs/index.php/rusc/article/viewFile/v8n1-bouchard/v8n1-bouchard-eng

>Once we agree that “information as data” is easily available to all, and that machines can do pretty much anything that an intelligent person can do, we are confronted with what is missing from this picture, namely the negotiated construction of knowledge. This is perhaps the most intriguing development resulting from the advent of the network age, although it is more reminiscent of small village cracker-barrel exchanges than futuristic networks: humans need to agree on stuff, but before they can do that, they need to talk about it.<

 Scott

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Comments

  • jaapsoft2  On March 13, 2011 at 8:34 PM

    Ha Scott, thanks for comment on http://connectiv.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/generalize-about-generations-cck11/. I really like your comment on TED TV, it gives me pleasure that I am not the only member of society who does not like that.
    I did read your post.
    I do not know whether connectivism is the real thing, I guess in the future other isms will emerge. But i like it to try to use the connectivist way of thinking to solve educational problems. Like this: What if a right wing politician tries to reform education and tries to put all teachers in front of the classroom to give ‘the old fashioned’ lessons like in the days of our grandfathers. Would that be a good idea? How to act as a teacher in that political and educational ‘back-to-the-good-old-times” policy? I only started thinking about that. How would connectivists solve this problem?
    Jaap

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